NewsIndustry Events2017 Northeast Potato Technology Forum

2017 Northeast Potato Technology Forum

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The 24th Annual 2017 Northeast Potato Technology Fourm is being held March 15-16, 2017 at the Crowne Plaza Lord Beaverbrook Hotel in downtown Fredericton.

The Northeast Potato Technology Forum is an annual event that provides potato researchers, extension specialists and industry representatives from Atlantic Canada and Northeastern United States an opportunity to discuss potato research and exchange technical information of benefit to the potato industry.

Participation is open to all private and public researchers, extension specialists, growers, and other potato industry personnel who would like to share information on a particular research topic or technology transfer project. This forum is an excellent opportunity to establish networks with potato specialists from the region, make new friends or renew friendships with old acquaintances.

Information and registration.

 

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