NewsIndustryP.E.I. Potato Breeder and Seed Company Joins Sustainability Group

P.E.I. Potato Breeder and Seed Company Joins Sustainability Group

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The recently created Potato Sustainability Alliance (PSA) has added Charlottetown, P.E.I.-based breeding and seed potato trading company HZPC Americas Corp, as a member to its organization, the group says in a news release.

“Fostering collaboration across the value chain is an essential component of PSA. By joining our organization and partnering with our members and potato farmers, HZPC can help catalyze opportunities for ongoing improvement in potato sustainability,” Laura Scandurra, executive director of PSA, says in the news release.

HZPC was founded in 1898 in The Netherlands, since then it has become a global market leader in seed potato trading, innovative breeding and concept development, the release says. HZPC offers potato varieties optimized for local growing conditions, and has over 400 employees based in 19 countries, with exports to over 90 countries.

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