Victoria Stamper Hired as New UPGC General Manager

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Following an extensive search the United Potato Growers of Canada (UPGC) has hired Victoria Stamper of Mascouche, Que. as its new general manager, an April 14 news release says. Stamper replaces outgoing General Manager Kevin MacIsaac who announced his retirement late last year.

“Our executive has conducted an extensive search for a candidate to fulfill the needs of our organization and to strengthen it going forward. Victoria’s commodity distribution background brings a new dynamic to our organization, and when coupled with her fluent presentation skill sets, make her an excellent fit to promote the principles of Supply and Demand for UPGC,” Ray Keenan, UPGC chairman says in the release.

Stamper grew up in London, Ont. and received a bachelor of commerce degree with a major in marketing from the University of Guelph. She later moved to Montreal where she received a bachelor or arts in psychology at McGill University. Stamper also has training in the Six Sigma Program at the yellow belt level. She has been an active volunteer with Pinewood Elementary, Scouts Canada, and the MS and Cancer Societies.

Stamper brings a commodities distribution background to the organization, with the principles of supply, demand, and profitability being very familiar to UPGC members, the release notes. Her previous work experience is in sales, purchasing, marketing, administration and human resources.

“(Potatoes are a) product that has to marketed, no matter if the commodity is steel or potatoes. World events are factors of influence, and a have a large affect on the membership needs of an organization like the United Potato Growers of Canada. I’m looking forward to working with potato growers all across the country by first of all learning about their needs and then by bringing value to their businesses,” Stamper says in the release.

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