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New Spud Smart Webinar: Managing Potato Virus Y

Managing Potato Virus Y Live on: Wednesday, September 5, 1 p.m. EDT Register here: http://spudsmart.com/webinar/ Join our webinar and find out how to manage potato virus Y. During this webinar, participants will learn: How to plan today to manage PVY Management tools PVY What challenges growers are facing with respect to PVY and why New tactics researchers are developing to fight PVY New control product available Speakers:  Mathuresh Singh, director of Agricultural Certification Services…

Colorado Potato Beetles Wanted

Dr. Ian Scott, a research scientist with the London Research and Development Centre at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, is conducting a survey of Colorado potato beetle susceptibility levels to registered insecticides (neonicotinoids, diamides and spinosyns). What does he need? He is looking for approximately 150 beetle adults (a minimum of 75 adults or large larvae are acceptable) per sample. If you have a few you can spare, please contact Dr. Scott and…

Colorado Potato Beetle Marches On

The most destructive potato crop pest in Canada, the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), shows no sign of slowing down. Indeed, since the 1950s, Colorado potato beetle has developed resistance to 52 different compounds belonging to all major insecticide classes, and resistance is growing to neonicotinoid chemistries. According to Dr. Tracy Shinners-Carnelley, vice president research and quality with Peak of the Market in Winnipeg, Man., there is an ongoing increase in the…

Study Traces the Origins of CPB

A new study from a University of Maryland-led team of researchers confirms the long held idea that the Colorado potato beetle, by far the most damaging insect to the U.S. — and Canadian — potato industry, originated in the Great Plains region of the United States. The findings dispel more recent theories that this beetle may have come from Mexico or other divergent populations. These findings shed new light on the origin of…

Colorado potato beetle genome gives insight into major agricultural pest

The Colorado potato beetle is notorious for its role in starting the pesticide industry — and for its ability to resist the insecticides developed to stop it. Managing the beetle costs tens of millions of dollars every year, but this is a welcome alternative to the billions of dollars in damage it could cause if left unchecked. To better understand this tenacious pest, a team of scientists led by University of Wisconsin–Madison…

When pests graze certain potatoes, yields double

When some Colombian potato varieties are lightly grazed by a pest, the plants respond by growing larger tubers, at times doubling their yields. Although many types of plants can repair pest damage while maintaining productivity, it’s rare to find species that actually overcompensate and increase productivity. Cornell and the Universidad Nacional de Colombia researchers first discovered this effect in a commercial Colombian potato in 2010. Now, a new study by the research…

Lunchtime is over for the Colorado potato beetle

Chemicals in the leaves of potato plants, produced naturally by the plant, may hold the key to a new way to control Colorado potato beetles — a major pest for potato growers. Dr. Helen Tai, an Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) research scientist, has turned to the leaves growing on wild potato relatives, leaves that beetles won’t eat, as a new approach to keep the pest away. Many plants in the potato…

Tasmanian potato growers preparing for the worst

Surveillance programs for tomato potato psyllid (TPP) are being ramped up in Tasmania as growers try to delay any incursion of the pest for as long as possible. TPP was detected in Western Australia (WA) earlier this year. Free sticky trap packs are being distributed by the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture to growers and agronomists to set up around the perimeter of susceptible crops, particularly potatoes, Tasmania’s biggest vegetable crop. The institute’s…

Zebra chip pathogen detected in psyllids in Alberta

Although the zebra chip pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso) has been detected in small numbers of potato psyllids in two sites in Alberta, no zebra chip symptoms or pathogen has been found in potato plant tissue. During three years of sampling for potato psyllids (Bactericera cockerelli) across Canada, the Canadian Potato Psyllid and Zebra Chip Monitoring Network found small numbers in Alberta (2015-2017, increasing annually), Saskatchewan (first time in 2016) and Manitoba…

Wasp released in NZ to control Tomato Potato Psyllid

A new biocontrol, Tamarixia trioaze, a parasitoid wasp which destroys the tomato potato psyllid (TPP) pest, has been released in Hawke’s Bay and Canterbury, New Zealand. These initial releases are the start of a wider planned release and monitoring program that is being supported with funding through the government of New Zealand’s Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF). The tomato potato psyllid has caused enormous problems for the potato, tomato, capsicum and tamarillo growers…

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